Graduate Courses

CRIM 536 Quantitative Methods in Sociology I
This course is an introduction to the practice of statistics in social and behavioral sciences. It is open to beginning graduate students and--with the permission of the instructor--advanced undergraduates. Topics covered include the description of social science data, in graphical and non-graphical form; correlation and other forms of association, including cross-tabulation; bivariate regression; an introduction to probability theory; the logic of sampling; the logic of statistical inference and significance tests. There is a lecture twice weekly and a mandatory "lab." Taught by: Allison, Smith Course usually offered in fall term Also Offered As: DEMG 535, SOCI 535 Activity: Lecture 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 600 Pro-Seminar in Criminology
This course provides an overview of the leading criminological theories of crime. The central focus is on the major theories of crime developed over the past century from the disciplines of economics, psychology, and sociology. The course will focus on the application of social science research as a way to evaluate theories of crime. Special attention is devoted to the issues of measurement of crime and what is known from the available empirical data. In addition, the course will focus on how these theoretical perspectives relate to public policy responses to crime. Course usually offered in fall term Activity: Seminar 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 601 Pro-Seminar in Criminal Justice
This course provides and overview of what we know about the criminal justice system in the United States and other developed nations. The central purpose of the course is to increas your knowledge about how the U.S. criminal justice system works but we will also spend a great deal of time thinking about the quality of the available evidence and how we know what we know. Topics covered will vary from year to year; recent topics have included police use of force, capital punishment, pre-trial detention, the use of predictive algorithms in the criminal justice system and the relationship between immigration and crime in the United States. Course usually offered in spring term Prerequisite: CRIM 600 Activity: Seminar 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 602 Criminal Justice Data Analytics
This course covers the tools and techniques to acquire, organize, link and visualize complex data in order to answer questions about crime and the criminal justice system. The course is organized around key questions about police shootings, victimization rates, identifying crime hotspots, calculating the cost of crime, and finding out what happens to crime when it rains. On the way to answer these questions, the course will cover topics including data sources, basic programming techniques, SQL, regular expressions, webscraping, and working with geographic data. The course will use R, an open-source, object oriented scripting language with a large set of available add-on packages. Taught by: Ridgeway Course usually offered in fall term Also Offered As: CRIM 402, SOCI 605 Activity: Lecture 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 603 Research Methods/Crime Analysis
This course provides an overview of the application of social science research methods and data analysis to criminology. Students will learn research design principles and statistical techiques for the analysis of social science data, including how to interpret results as part of the rigorous practice of evidence-based criminology. M.S. students will conduct a semester-long, data-intensive crime analysis project using quantitative methods to address a specific research question. Student projects culminate with a poster presentation, an oral defense, and the submission of a written research paper. Course usually offered in spring term Activity: Seminar 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 604 Criminology in Practice
In this capstone course, students will meet weekly with guests who work on or close to the front line of the criminal justice system. Past guests have included police chiefs, forensic scientists, lobbyists for gun rights and lobbyist for gun control, formerly incarcerated individuals, crime analysts, directors of sentencing commissions, prosecutors and defenders, politicians, and researchers at research organizations working closely with criminal justice agencies. Guests share their career paths, the roles of their organizations in the justice system, and key justice system challenges. Students interact with all guest speakers. Two terms. student must enter first term. Activity: Seminar 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 634 Evidence-Based Crime Prevention
This course considers the use of evidence to identify effective crime prevention policies. The course will teach students to think critically about what constitutes convincing evidence, use benefit-cost analysis in comparing policy alternatives, and write effective policy memos that can translate research into practice. We will develop these skills by studying the effects of different policy approaches to crime prevention including incarceration, policing, gun control, drug regulation, and place-based interventions, as well as education, social programs, and labor market policies. Emphasis will be on the methodological challenges to identifying "what works" and the empirical methods to overcome those challenges. Course usually offered in fall term Activity: Lecture 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 662 Panel Data Analysis
This course focuses on the ability to use, analyze, and understand panel data. Panel data contain repeated measurements of the dependent variable for the same individuals, and possibly repeated measurements of the predictor variables as well. Panel data offer important opportunities for controlling unobserved variables and for answering questions about causal ordering. Taught by: Song Also Offered As: DEMG 662, SOCI 662 Activity: Lecture 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 671 Violence: A Clinical Neuroscience Approach
Developed for both Psychology and Criminology graduates in particular, this interdisciplinary course outlines a clinical neuroscience approach to understanding violence in which the tools of neuroscience- neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurocognition, neuroendocrinology, neuropharmacology, molecular and behavioral genetics- are used to help inform the etiology and treatment of violence. Clinical components include psychopathy, proactive and reactive aggression, homicide domestic violence, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, antisocial personality disorder, crime, and delinquency as well as their comorbid conditions (schizophrenia, drug abuse, hyperactivity). The interaction between social, psychological, and neurobiological processes in predisposing to violence will be highlighted, together with neurodevelopmental perspectives on violence focusing on prospective longitudinal and brain imaging research. Key implications for the criminal justice system, neuroethics, forensics psychology, and intervention will also be outlined. Course usually offered in fall term Also Offered As: PSYC 671 Activity: Lecture 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 700 Advanced Pro-Seminar in Criminology
This second year doctoral course is a weekly discussion group designed to help students integrate their coursework from different disciplines around the unifying perspectives of criminology. It focuses on preparation for the doctoral comprehensive examination, detailed critiques of published research reports, and colloquia by leading guest lecturers presenting new research results. Students preparing for dissertation research on the causes and prevention of crime will report on their developing research ideas. Course usually offered in fall term Activity: Seminar 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 701 Advanced Pro-Seminar in Criminal Justice
This second year doctoral course is a weekly discussion group designed to help students integrate their coursework from different disciplines around the behavior and operation of criminal law systems. It focuses on preparation for the doctoral comprehensive examination, detailed critiques of published and unpublished research reports, and colloquia by leading guest lecturers presenting new research results. Students preparing for dissertation research on the behavior of criminal law will report on their developing research ideas. Course usually offered in spring term Activity: Seminar 1.0 Course Unit
 
CRIM 999 Independent Study and Research
Primarily for advanced students who work with individual faculty upon permission. Intended to go beyond existing graduate courses in the study of specific problems or theories or to provide work opportunities in areas not covered by existing courses. One-term course offered either term Activity: Independent Study 1.0 Course Unit Notes: Both terms.