Courses for Fall 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
CRIM 100-401 CRIMINOLOGY MACDONALD, JOHN TR 0900AM-1030AM This introductory course examines the multi-disciplinary science of law-making, law-breaking, and law-enforcing. It reviews theories and data predicting where, when, by whom and against whom crimes happen. It also addresses the prevention of different offense types by different kinds of offenders against different kinds of people. Police, courts, prisons, and other institutions are critically examined as both preventing and causing crime. This course meets the general distribution requirement.
    Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
    CRIM 150-001 STAT FOR THE SOCIAL SCI. RIDGEWAY, GREGORY CANCELED Statistical techniques and quantitative reasoning are essential tools for properly examining questions in the social sciences. This course introduces students to the concepts of probability, estimation, confidence intervals, and statistical inference. The course has an applied focus and will show students how to use the statistical concepts and methods to answer social science questions. The course will require the use of R, a free, open source statistical analysis program. This course has been approved for the quantitative data analysis requirement (QDA).
      COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
      CRIM 230-401 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY MONGE, JANET F 0200PM-0500PM
        CRIM 250-001 STAT FOR THE SOCIAL SCI.: STATISTICS FOR THE SOCIAL SCIENCE I RIDGEWAY, GREGORY TR 0130PM-0300PM
          CRIM 252-001 EVIDENCE-BASED CRIMINAL JUSTICE
            CRIM 315-001 AM DEATH PEN. THRY & PRA DOLGENOS, THOMAS TR 0300PM-0430PM
              CRIM 402-401 CRIM JUSTICE ANALYTICS RIDGEWAY, GREGORY TR 1200PM-0130PM This course covers the tools and techniques to acquire, organize, link and visualize complex data in order to answer questions about crime and the criminal justice system. The course is organized around key questions about police shootings, victimization rates, benchmarking justice system performance, identifying crime hotspots, calculating the cost of crime, and finding out what happens to crime when it rains. On the way to answer these questions, the course will cover topics including data sources, basic programming techniques, SQL, text mining, regular expressions, and geocoding. The course will us R, an open-source, object scripting language with a large set of available add-on packages.
                CRIM 410-401 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN EXPERIMENTS IN CRIME AND JUSTICE LOEFFLER, CHARLES W 0200PM-0500PM This seminar focuses on examining data from experiments in criminology including: randomized controlled trials of criminal justice policies, "natural" experiments in crime, and other quasi-experimental studies. A series of experiments conducted by Penn scholars and elsewhere will be examined. This seminar also guides criminology majors in writing a research proposal for their thesis. Students will learn about how to formulate a research question, develop a review of the literature, and how to apply necessary empirical methods. The final paper for this course will be a research proposal that can serve as the basis for the student's senior thesis and to satisfy the senior capstone requirement. Readings will come from the disciplines of criminology, sociology, psychology, economics, and urban planning.
                  CRIM 535-001 INTRODUCTION TO QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR POLICY ANALYSIS CHALFIN, AARON MW 1000AM-1130AM This course is an introduction to the basic mathematical tools and ideas that support quantitative policy analysis. By the end of the semester, students will be able to identify and explain measures of central tendency and variation for catergorical and continuous variables; describe the statistical relationship between two variables; conduct and explain "foundational" statistical tests, including hypothesis testing and linear regression analysis; manipulate data sets and write simple statistical programs in Stata.
                    SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                    CRIM 535-101 LABORATORY F 1000AM-1200PM This course is an introduction to the basic mathematical tools and ideas that support quantitative policy analysis. By the end of the semester, students will be able to identify and explain measures of central tendency and variation for catergorical and continuous variables; describe the statistical relationship between two variables; conduct and explain "foundational" statistical tests, including hypothesis testing and linear regression analysis; manipulate data sets and write simple statistical programs in Stata.
                      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                      CRIM 600-301 PRO-SEM IN CRIMINOLOGY MACDONALD, JOHN R 0130PM-0430PM This course provides an overview of the leading criminological theories of crime. The central focus is on the major theories of crime developed over the past century from the disciplines of economics, psychology, and sociology. The course will focus on the application of social science research as a way to evaluate theories of crime. Special attention is devoted to the issues of measurement of crime and what is known from the available empirical data. In addition, the course will focus on how these theoretical perspectives relate to public policy responses to crime.
                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                        CRIM 602-401 CRIM JUSTICE ANALYTICS RIDGEWAY, GREGORY TR 1200PM-0130PM This course covers the tools and techniques to acquire, organize, link and visualize complex data in order to answer questions about crime and the criminal justice system. The course is organized around key questions about police shootings, victimization rates, benchmarking justice system performance, identifying crime hotspots, calculating the cost of crime, and finding out what happens to crime when it rains. On the way to answer these questions, the course will cover topics including data sources, basic programming techniques, SQL, text mining, regular expressions, and geocoding. The course will use R, an open-source, object oriented scripting language with a large set of available add-on packages.
                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                          CRIM 604-301 CRIMINOLOGY IN PRACTICE RIDGEWAY, GREGORY T 0400PM-0600PM In this capstone course speakers from the University of Pennsylvania and other academic institutions and from non-profit research organizations discuss their research, while speakers from government and criminal justice policy and practice settings -the consumer of research- share their insights. Members of the cohort interact with all guest speakers.
                            MAJORS ONLY; NON-MAJORS NEED PERMISSION FROM DEPARTMENT; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                            CRIM 610-401 RESEARCH SEMINAR IN EXPERIMENTS IN CRIME AND JUSTICE LOEFFLER, CHARLES W 0200PM-0500PM
                              CRIM 634-001 EVIDENCE-BASED CRIM PREV M 0200PM-0500PM This course considers the use of evidence to identify effective crime prevention policies. The course will teach students to think critically about what constitutes convincing evidence, use benefit-cost analysis in comparing policy alternatives, and write effective policy memos that can translate research into practice. We will develop these skills by studying the effects of different policy approaches to crime prevention including incarceration, policing, gun control, drug regulation, and place-based interventions, as well as education, social programs, and labor market policies. Emphasis will be on the methodological challenges to identifying "what works" and the empirical methods to overcome those challenges.
                                CRIM 634-002 EVIDENCE-BASED CRIM PREV This course considers the use of evidence to identify effective crime prevention policies. The course will teach students to think critically about what constitutes convincing evidence, use benefit-cost analysis in comparing policy alternatives, and write effective policy memos that can translate research into practice. We will develop these skills by studying the effects of different policy approaches to crime prevention including incarceration, policing, gun control, drug regulation, and place-based interventions, as well as education, social programs, and labor market policies. Emphasis will be on the methodological challenges to identifying "what works" and the empirical methods to overcome those challenges.