Courses for Spring 2020

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
CRIM 200-401 Criminal Justice Brandy Blasko TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM This course examines how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The course reviews the historical development of criminal justice agencies in the United States and Europe and the available scientific evidence on the effect these agencies have on controlling crime. The course places an emphasis on the functional creation of criminal justice agencies and the discretionary role decision makers in these agencies have in deciding how to enforce criminal laws and whom to punish. Evidence on how society measures crime and the role that each major criminal justice agency plays in controlling crime is examined from the perspective of crime victims, police, prosecutors, jurors, judges, prison officials, probation officers and parole board members. Using the model of social policy evaluation, the course asks students to consider how the results of criminal justice could be more effectively delivered to reduce the social and economic costs of crime. SOCI200401 Society sector (all classes)
CRIM 300-001 Law and Criminal Justice Ruth Ann Moyer TR 01:30 PM-03:00 PM This course explores constitutional criminal procedure or the law of the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments to the United States Constitution. Topics included the laws and rules associated with search and seizure, arrest, interrogation, the exclusionary rule, and deprivation of counsel. Social science evidence that supports or raises questions about legal doctrine will be examined. No prerequisites are required.
CRIM 315-001 Am Death Pen. Thry & Pra Thomas W Dolgenos TR 03:00 PM-04:30 PM Over the past forty years, in response to controversy over the American death penalty, the Supreme Court has created a framework of rules designed to make the death penalty conform to current societal standards. In this course, we will identify the critical issues identified by the courts (and the critics) in light of the practical realities of capital litigation, and we will ask whether the efforts to address these issues have been successful. The class will use specific case examples to identify the critical points in a death penalty case- for example, the decision to designate a prosecution as "capital", the performance of defense counsel, the penalty decision, and the method of execution. These critical stages will provide a platform for discussing critical issues like the proper limits of discretion; bias; cruelty; and the decision to disqualify certain groups of people from capital punishment (the mentally disabled, minors).
CRIM 474-401 Modern Regression Richard A Berk MW 09:00 AM-10:30 AM This course covers supervised learning: various forms of nonparametric regression and machine learning. It assumes at least one solid course in conventional linear regression, although that framework is discarded the first week of class. Intuitive explanations for key statistical concepts are provided with little dependence on formal mathematics. Grades are based on research reports in which modern statistical procedures are applied to real and challenging datasets. Some might call these excercises "analytics". All class demonstrations are done with the programming language R, and R is required for the research reports. STAT474401, STAT974401
CRIM 474-402 Modern Regression Richard A Berk TR 09:00 AM-10:30 AM This course covers supervised learning: various forms of nonparametric regression and machine learning. It assumes at least one solid course in conventional linear regression, although that framework is discarded the first week of class. Intuitive explanations for key statistical concepts are provided with little dependence on formal mathematics. Grades are based on research reports in which modern statistical procedures are applied to real and challenging datasets. Some might call these excercises "analytics". All class demonstrations are done with the programming language R, and R is required for the research reports. STAT474402, STAT974402
CRIM 601-301 Pro-Sem in Crim Justice Aaron J Chalfin W 03:30 PM-06:30 PM This course provides and overview of what we know about the criminal justice system in the United States and other developed nations. The central purpose of the course is to increas your knowledge about how the U.S. criminal justice system works but we will also spend a great deal of time thinking about the quality of the available evidence and how we know what we know. Topics covered will vary from year to year; recent topics have included police use of force, capital punishment, pre-trial detention, the use of predictive algorithms in the criminal justice system and the relationship between immigration and crime in the United States.
CRIM 603-301 Res Meth/Crime Analysis Greg Ridgeway TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course provides an overview of the application of social science research methods and data analysis to criminology. Students will learn research design principles and statistical techiques for the analysis of social science data, including how to interpret results as part of the rigorous practice of evidence-based criminology. M.S. students will conduct a semester-long, data-intensive crime analysis project using quantitative methods to address a specific research question. Student projects culminate with a poster presentation, an oral defense, and the submission of a written research paper. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Majors Only</span>
CRIM 604-301 Criminology in Practice Greg Ridgeway T 04:00 PM-06:00 PM In this capstone course, students will meet weekly with guests who work on or close to the front line of the criminal justice system. Past guests have included police chiefs, forensic scientists, lobbyists for gun rights and lobbyist for gun control, formerly incarcerated individuals, crime analysts, directors of sentencing commissions, prosecutors and defenders, politicians, and researchers at research organizations working closely with criminal justice agencies. Guests share their career paths, the roles of their organizations in the justice system, and key justice system challenges. Students interact with all guest speakers. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Undergraduates Need Permission</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Year Long Course</span>
CRIM 671-401 Violence: Clin Neuro App Adrian Raine TR 10:30 AM-12:00 PM Developed for both Psychology and Criminology graduates in particular, this interdisciplinary course outlines a clinical neuroscience approach to understanding violence in which the tools of neuroscience- neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurocognition, neuroendocrinology, neuropharmacology, molecular and behavioral genetics- are used to help inform the etiology and treatment of violence. Clinical components include psychopathy, proactive and reactive aggression, homicide domestic violence, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, antisocial personality disorder, crime, and delinquency as well as their comorbid conditions (schizophrenia, drug abuse, hyperactivity). The interaction between social, psychological, and neurobiological processes in predisposing to violence will be highlighted, together with neurodevelopmental perspectives on violence focusing on prospective longitudinal and brain imaging research. Key implications for the criminal justice system, neuroethics, forensics psychology, and intervention will also be outlined. PSYC671401
CRIM 700-301 Advanced Prosem in Crim Greg Ridgeway W 09:00 AM-12:00 PM This second year doctoral course is a weekly discussion group designed to help students integrate their coursework from different disciplines around the unifying perspectives of criminology. It focuses on preparation for the doctoral comprehensive examination, detailed critiques of published research reports, and colloquia by leading guest lecturers presenting new research results. Students preparing for dissertation research on the causes and prevention of crime will report on their developing research ideas. <span class="penncourse-course-notes">Permission Needed From Department</span><br /><span class="penncourse-course-notes">Majors Only</span>