Courses for Spring 2018

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
CRIM 200-401 CRIMINAL JUSTICE CHALFIN, AARON TR 1030AM-1200PM This course examines how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The course reviews the historical development of criminal justice agencies in the United States and Europe and the available scientific evidence on the effect these agencies have on controlling crime. The course places an emphasis on the functional creation of criminal justice agencies and the discretionary role decision makers in these agencies have in deciding how to enforce criminal laws and whom to punish. Evidence on how society measures crime and the role that each major criminal justice agency plays in controlling crime is examined from the perspective of crime victims, police, prosecutors, jurors, judges, prison officials, probation officers and parole board members. Using the model of social policy evaluation, the course asks students to consider how the results of criminal justice could be more effectively delivered to reduce the social and economic costs of crime.
    Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
    CRIM 230-401 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY COX, SAMANTHA TR 1030AM-1200PM
      CRIM 251-001 STAT FOR THE SOC SCI II OUSS, AURELIE TR 0300PM-0430PM This is meant to be a second course in applied statistics and data analysis on the criminal justice applications and criminal justice data. The general linear model (regression and analysis of variance) is the primary statistical topic with some discussion of smoothers and logistic regression when there is time. With modern data analysis computer packages, actual computations have become trivial. In this course, therefore, the focus will be on what to compute and how to interpret the results. The emphasis is on the intelligent use of statistics. This is not a math course, or a course in mathematical statistics. The statistical programming language R will be taught in concert with the other course material, and all assignments will need to be undertaken in R.
        CRIM 260-001 CRIME & HUMAN DEVELOPMNT LOEFFLER, CHARLES TR 0900AM-1030AM One of the central research problems in criminology is the relationship between human development and the likelihood of committing crime. This course will examine the tools for measuring the onset of crime, its persistence, intermittency, and desistence. These tools include the study of birth cohorts of everyone born in a certain time and place, life course studies of juvenile delinquents and non-delinquents, trajectory analysis of people studied from pre-school through middle age, and interviews with 70 year old former delinquents who reflect on how their life-course affected the crimes they committed. This course will also examine the research findings that have been produced using these tools. Students will be asked to consider what these findings imply for major theories of crime causation as well as policies for crime prevention.
          CRIM 270-001 BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL CRIM RAINE, ADRIAN TR 0130PM-0300PM Is there a "natural-born killer"? Why don't psychopaths have a conscience? And is it morally wrong for us to punish those who are biologically-wired for a life of crime? This interdisciplinary biosocial course argues that answers to these inscrutable questions can be found in the fledging field of "neurocriminology". This new sub-discipline brings together the social, clinical, and neurosciences to help us better understand, predict, and prevent future crime. We will explore the biosocial bases to crime and violence, analyze controversial neuroethical, legal and philosophical issues surrounding neurocriminology, and take a field trip to prison. This interdisciplinary course presents perspectives from the fields of psychology, neuroscience, criminology, sociology, law, business, public health, psychiatry, anthropology, neuroimaging, neuroendocrinology, forensics, nutrition, and pediatrics. It is suitable for those without a background in biology or criminology. It is particularly relevant for majors in Criminology, Psychology, Nursing, and Biological Basis of Behavior.
            CRIM 280-401 NEIGHBRHD DYN. OF CRIME LOEFFLER, CHARLES TR 1200PM-0130PM Crime varies in time, space and populations as it reflects ecological structures and the routine social interactions that occur in daily life. Concentrations of crime can be found among locations, with antisocial activities like assaults and theft occurring at higher rates because of the demographic make-up of people (e.g. adolescents) or conflicts (e.g. competing gangs), for reasons examined by ecological criminology. Variation in socio-demographic structures (age, education ratios, and the concentration of poverty) and the physical environment (housing segregation, density of bars, street lighting) predicts variations between neighborhoods in the level of crime and disorder. Both ethnographic and quantitative research methods are used to explore the connections between the social and physical environment of areas and antisocial behavior.
              CRIM 474-401 MODERN REGRESSION BERK, RICHARD MW 0900AM-1030AM This course covers supervised learning: various forms of nonparametric regression and machine learning. It assumes at least one solid course in conventional linear regression, although that framework is discarded the first week of class. Intuitive explanations for key statistical concepts are provided with little dependence on formal mathematics. Grades are based on research reports in which modern statistical procedures are applied to real and challenging datasets. Some might call these excercises "analytics". All class demonstrations are done with the programming language R, and R is required for the research reports.
                CRIM 474-402 MODERN REGRESSION BERK, RICHARD TR 0900AM-1030AM This course covers supervised learning: various forms of nonparametric regression and machine learning. It assumes at least one solid course in conventional linear regression, although that framework is discarded the first week of class. Intuitive explanations for key statistical concepts are provided with little dependence on formal mathematics. Grades are based on research reports in which modern statistical procedures are applied to real and challenging datasets. Some might call these excercises "analytics". All class demonstrations are done with the programming language R, and R is required for the research reports.
                  CRIM 601-301 PRO-SEM IN CRIM JUSTICE CHALFIN, AARON TR 0130PM-0300PM This course examines the scholarship on the causes and consequences of the development of the criminal justice system. The primary focus of the course is on the historical development and contemporary impact of key actors in the criminal justice system, such as the police, courts, and corrections, on society. The course will examine the social and economic effect of criminal justice policies and practices. The course emphasizes evidence from the available social science research in the United States, with some reference to research in other European nations.
                    CRIM 603-301 RES METH/CRIME ANALYSIS MACDONALD, JOHN MW 0200PM-0330PM This course provides an overview of the application of social science research methods and data analysis to criminology. The course will place an emphasis on diagnostic and analytic tools for the data analysis. Students will learn basic statistical techniques for the analysis of social science data and how to interpret results as part of the rigorous practice of evidence-based Criminology. M.S. Studentw will perform semester-long, data-based crime analysis project using quantitative analysis to address a specific research question. Student projects culminate with an oral class presentation and the submission of a written thesis.
                      MAJORS ONLY
                      CRIM 604-301 CRIMINOLOGY IN PRACTICE RIDGEWAY, GREGORY T 0400PM-0600PM In this capstone course speakers from the University of Pennsylvania and other academic institutions and from non-profit research organizations discuss their research, while speakers from government and criminal justice policy and practice settings -the consumer of research- share their insights. Members of the cohort interact with all guest speakers.
                        YEAR LONG COURSE; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION